RESEARCH PROJECTS

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COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS WITH MS EXCEL®

Through the many years of successfully developing and using computational physics models for solving problems, we have found that Excel is an excellent tool that supports model building from simple calculations to even sophisticated models as it is also an extremely fast matrix calculator. Excel is ubiquitous and hence readily available and it is affordable.

We are exploring the development of Excel based models for problem solving in photonics, for simulating CPS (cyber physical systems) and for exploring new applications in the area of memristor networks and neuromorphic systems.

In Addition, most of the applications described under "Development Projects" are based on Excel models.


COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS - APPLICATIONS

Memristor Networks
Memristors are a new class of devices, which promise energy and computation efficient implementations of very large scale neural networks. We are using resistor network models to simulate the behaviour of memristor networks.

Silicon Retina (Si-Retina)
The Si-retina is an electronic implementation of the retina functions found in the eyes of humans and animals. It dates back to early work of Carver Mead and is described in his book "Analog VLSI and Neural Systems".
We are using resistor network simulations to study computationally efficient implementations of image and signal analysis functions with Si-retina based models.


CYBER PHYSICAL SYSTEMS - NEURO INSPIRED META-MODELS

Cyber physical systems (CPS) enable applications not previously possible by networking components incorporating tightly-connected physical and computational (cyber) functions. We are exploring neural network based meta-models to simulate the behaviour of the cyber and the physical components as well as their interactions. Meta-models are computationally efficient, can be easily upgraded and can be networked to simulate even large-scale cyber physical systems. This allows for studying and optimizing such systems at an early development stage by using simulation.

(see "Recent Publication")